Story and Horse

Stories & Tarot with Emily McGill

June 11, 2022 Season 1 Episode 33
Story and Horse
Stories & Tarot with Emily McGill
Show Notes Transcript

Stories & Tarot with Emily McGill

Join Emily McGill and host Hilary Adams for a creative conversation about the power of story, and the responsibility we have when we construct and share stories, both our own and for others. We are treated to a three card tarot reading, specifically with you, the Story and Horse podcast listeners in mind. Emily narrates the story of the cards, what they look like, and their meanings - which directly tie into the theme of the power of story and our responsibility to wield stories wisely. 

Emily McGill's Bio:
After 15 years in New York City as a Broadway and entertainment publicist and consultant, Emily's self-exploration led to healing, evolution, and reading tarot cards professionally.  

Invited to read tarot for virtual Burning Man 2021 and Brooklyn's dry speakeasy Club Curious, Emily has been featured by The Tamron Hall Show, the NY Post, and Thrive Global.  She writes Playbill’s Broadway Horoscopes and is developing her own tarot deck, The Broadway Tarot.

She’s the co-founder of S.N.O.B. (Sunday Night on Broadway), a popup Broadway industry dance party, a founding member of PR collective Spiral5, and a co-author of S5’s The Career Rebel’s Guide to Modern PR.  

Connect with Emily McGill:
Website: https://www.emilymcgillentertainment.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/emilyannemcg/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emilyannemcg
Special Offering: 25% off a 30 or 60 minute Tarot reading with the coupon code "CUPS"

Host Hilary Adams is an award-winning theatre director, coach, equine-partnered facilitator, and founder of Story and Horse. She is all about supporting creative expression and sharing stories with the world.

Connect with Story and Horse
www.storyandhorse.com
Facebook: @storyandhorse
Instagram: @storyandhorse

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Intro:

Welcome to Story and Horse, a podcast where we hear stories from creative lives. Meet new people, hear about their challenges and triumphs, and get inspired to move forward with your creativity. Now, here's your host, Hilary Adams.

Hilary Adams:

Hello, I'm Hilary Adams, founder of Story and Horse, and the host of the Story and Horse Podcast. You can find out more about me and Story and Horse at story and horse.com and on Facebook and Instagram at Story and Horse. Today we are joined by Emily McGill. Emily is a spiritual seeker, tarot reader, storytelling strategist, and a deep believer in the power of community. Hey, Emily, thanks so much for joining me here today.

Emily McGill:

Oh, my gosh, Hillary, thank you so much for having me. I'm thrilled to be connecting with you.

Hilary Adams:

So can you start us off by telling us a little bit about who you are and what you're up to what you do?

Emily McGill:

Yeah, so I jokingly refer to myself, I don't think it's actually a joke anymore. Though, as a recovering Broadway publicist, I spent about 15 years I've been in New York for 18 years, and for the majority of that time, I've been working in and around the Broadway community. And for most of that time as a publicist, and entertainment, communications specialist, and consultant, and I realized during the pandemic that I think I had known prior to this, that I actually didn't like PR at all. But I learned so much about how to tell a story. And you know, what makes something interesting, as far as how to capture folks attention. And I learned a lot of, you know, I jokingly now keep saying, I might not know where someone's bodies are buried, but I certainly know how to bury them. You know, when it comes to the storytelling and the, you know, don't spin the spinner kind of thing, right? Like, there's so much that you learn about how to do all of that. But for me, I prefer now just like to talk to people and connect with people, and hear their stories and hear what they have to say, or what they're out here in the world doing. And so I'm stepping away from the PR, I'm actually going to Columbia University this fall to get my Master's in a program called spirituality, Mind Body Institute. So it's a program. That's a psychology and education degree. And I'm really excited about it. I have no idea what I'm getting into. But I need a little bit of a palate cleanser from Broadway and entertainment, and the media and all of that. And so I thought, let's go do something drastically different. And started following the yeses. And here we are.

Hilary Adams:

Wow, congratulations on that. Thank you starting a new path.

Emily McGill:

Yeah, it's pretty wild.

Hilary Adams:

But coming out of the PR, it sounds like the thing that you're carrying with you. Is this love story?

Emily McGill:

Absolutely. Absolutely.

Hilary Adams:

And for you, what is the -- why is that compelling?

Emily McGill:

Well, it's the oldest form of gathering we have, right? I mean, humanity survive, because we gathered around a fire and told the stories of our day and how we survived and the things we ate, and we didn't and the animals we came across and how, you know, the hunting and the gathering and the truly the human humanity wouldn't exist if it weren't for storytelling, if it weren't for that really oral relation of language, which then, you know, obviously evolved into so many different expressions of language that we have now globally, and ways of communicating and telling story. But it's, it's it's the absolute oldest tradition we have.

Hilary Adams:

And you're helping people you're trying to help people tell their stories.

Emily McGill:

Yes, I have been working with, with some clients, I had one this spring, who had a book that she had just she written a musical, and everyone told her read like a book. So she said, Okay, I'll turn it into a book. We're in the middle of a pandemic. And so she wrote her first novel, and, you know, we helped her craft her story around that and we did do some press with it. But we found that there was just such a great experience of, of seeing her sort of, even as an actor She's an actress, a writer, you know, a coach and all of these things that she does in her life, she sings, I mean, she, you know, she sang on the Tamron Hall Show because we had the opportunity to talk about her and sort of get that ball rolling and have that story. refine itself, the more she got to tell it, the more she got to refine it. It's kind of like, the way comedians like work on their sets. Do you think about like, the way a comedian is able to get the information that they need is the feedback from the audience. So the more you tell your story to different people to different audiences, the more you find the lines that land, the ones that don't the details that you think are so important, and like central to the story, and like someone else is like, Oh, look at that butterfly, you know. So, you know, it's really helpful to, to sort of practice and rehearse but also just do the storytelling of your own life as you're moving through the world and talking to people. So I am finding that I enjoy that more and more,

Hilary Adams:

versus not just the story of the creation of the book. And the story inside the book, such as those stories. It's also the story of the storyteller. Yes, the story of the self. Yeah, of the self. And that's the part where people I have found in working as a coach, that's the part where people get tangled.

Emily McGill:

Yeah, absolutely. Because it's so overwhelming to try and distill your life story into an elevator pitch. You know, I mean, especially because you were the you're the one that lived it. And when you don't have an outside perspective to say, Oh, why not start with this thing, or here's a kernel of something that you said, that's really nailing it for me, or that's, that's super engaging and interesting. You know, there, there are different ways into our story. And so it's just a matter of like choosing the door that you want to allow people to walk through to tell the beginning of your story. I mean, recovering Broadway publicists turned tarot reader is, you know, the headline that I sold the New York Post, and they took it, but you know, it's like, you really think about the ways we label and identify ourselves, and how that can be both limiting. And it can be something to use as an opportunity. Because oftentimes, the stories we tell about ourselves, or the limiting beliefs that we have, whether they we have accepted them from society, we've accepted them from our parents, we've accepted them from the stories we've told ourselves about what is happening around us. There's so many different ways these stories get written that have nothing to do with us, but we believe them in our deepest core. And, like, this is why I got into tear apart of how and why I got into tarot, I went to therapy to undo all of the stories I had about myself. And my therapist introduced me to tarot, she would have me pull a card every now and again if I didn't know what to do about something. And so it became this, this, I didn't know it at the time. But it became a tool of self communication, of how to tell myself the stories that I'm telling myself, right. So it's, I like to say that it takes something in your gut or your heart. And the taro allows you to translate it up for your head. So you get this information that you hold within yourself. You call it your intuition, call it whatever you want to call it. But it's like you're texting yourself a me. You're like, this is what I'm trying to say to you.

Hilary Adams:

Yeah, I love that as a tool of self communication.

Emily McGill:

Yeah, because when you're not sure about something, you don't know what direction you want to go. You actually do know what direction you want to go. But you might be scared to admit it to yourself. And we're also so programmed for fear that I think something like the taro allows us to have a little more space to replace that fear with curiosity, where it's not, we're not scared about the things we might learn. We're excited about the things we might learn because those are sort of the same feeling in the body right like when you're, you think about like people go through a haunted house, but I don't I'm so not into that. I will not like you will not get me into a haunted house. I will not watch a scary movie. I am absolutely not interested in inviting that kind of energy into my life. But if we're talking about out, you know, going on some ride at an amusement park that is a little bit terrifying. I am very much on board for that, you know, if we're talking about doing something like, I would go skydiving, if someone invited me, you know, like, I mean, I am here for these experiences that feel like they could be very scary. But it's that like exhilarating fear versus the debilitating fear. And I think that sometimes we don't know what we want to do about something, or we don't think we want to know what we do about what to do about something. It's really just like that debilitating fear of like, what if I succeed?

Hilary Adams:

That's really interesting. Thank you. For people listening, I'm gonna do this, I usually do this later in the podcast, I'm gonna do it here. Because I think we're gonna go into the Tarot in a moment. So I just want to wrap this part up by asking this. For people listening, do you have a suggestion or a thought? If they're feeling? How do I make that headline, or this wonderful, delightful, messy life that I've got going on?

Emily McGill:

I think part of it is, is, is a level of self exploration, a willingness to have some self exploration, and to say, Okay, here's, you know, here are five different parts of me, here are five different things I love to do, or however many, right like, write them down, write down the things that you love the way you spend your time. I mean, give you you know, if you want to write yourself a bio, you don't need to write your life story, right? Like, keep it more, unless there are things that were super, you know, you want an Oscar 13, whatever, like, yeah, you might want to include that. But otherwise, I would say, you know, keep it contemporary, keep it as to what you are doing in the present in the, in the current iteration of yourself, you can certainly have, you know, your past experience and history as sort of like bullet points, right, and then look at all of that together, and see what it is that you want to talk about, or what it is that you think that the audience would want to hear about. You know, off, I know, this is a huge piece of advice that is given all the time. But like, when you're writing, when you're creating story, always have one audience member in mind. Right, your, you know, some people like to call your avatar or your ideal, whatever. But you think about one person that you know, that you actually know, that like, and try and tell that person that story. And think about how they would receive it, and then maybe try actually telling them that story and see how it's received.

Hilary Adams:

Thank you. That goes back in the beginning of our conversation, you talked about practicing story. Mm hmm. And how that helps distill what you are conveying? Yeah, absolutely. And that goes back to the limiting belief and fear idea. You've got to be willing to actually tell people your story, and try and maybe not get it. Right. Right. And I get it, not feel right at first.

Emily McGill:

Absolutely. And also knowing that it not only is it allowed to change, it's supposed to change, we change, we evolve, we grow. We are not the same being that we were yesterday that we were six weeks ago that we were five minutes ago, you know that we're different people than we were when we started this conversation. So things can change in an instant. And you're allowed to change your mind whenever you want.

Hilary Adams:

Yeah, I think that's a great way to segue into Taro. Tell us a little bit we've talked a little bit about Tarot. So can you tell us a little bit about Tara that you're going to do here? And we're gonna do a little Tarot reading?

Emily McGill:

Yes, yes. I'm so excited. So, as I said, tarot to me is a form of self communication and a way that I just tap into myself to say, is this you know, what, what do I want? What am I doing? What am I thinking? Where am I going? I pull a card every morning. You know, just to sort of give myself a sense of my day, or what might be happening in my life. Sometimes I feel the resonance sometimes I don't, right. It's not always

Hilary Adams:

the most

Emily McGill:

It's not always hitting me over my head. Sometimes it's subtle. You know sometimes we're we are having really big experiences and feeling change happen in a really big way.

Hilary Adams:

That's fantastoc/ What deck are you using?

Emily McGill:

yes so today I'm using the True Heart Intuitive Tarot so here's the image of it. It's like a light blue cover. It says true heart intuitive Tarot across the top. And then we see a female figure holding a sort of like, knapsack, you know, a stick with a with a piece of cloth wrapped around the end of it, and a flower and sort of Sun sitting above her head. And this is the image of the fool card in this deck. Oh. Yeah. And looks like a traveler with her. Yes, exactly. Because the fool is the is the character. We're the archetype of the major arcana. So there's two parts of the Tarot, the major arcana and the minor arcana. And our conic just means part or section, and the Major Arcana, they're like our magic cards. So when they show up, we want to pay special attention. There are 22 of them. And they correspond to the human souls evolutionary journey. So that fool is the first one that that fresh, naive, trusting, like, every step is a yes, do we're ready to go on this journey together. So excited, we're going to take this leap. And then we go all the way up through the world, which is the completion energy, that whole healed holy energy. And that is the other way you could sort of look at the major arcana is like, it's like the hero's journey, right? That story that we're so used to hearing throughout, you know, history, and the archetypes that come up in the Major Arcana are really those archetypes that we see across all sorts of storytelling. The Minor Arcana, which is the other half of the deck is set up kind of like a deck of playing cards. So you've got four suits. Each of the suits corresponds to one of our four elements. And then we have ace through 10, our pip cards, and then four court cards instead of three. So we have a king and a Queen and Knight and a Page. Sometimes you'll see Prince and Princess. Sometimes you'll see father, mother, son and daughter. It's really dependent on the author of the deck and what they chose to do. This is Prince and Princess in this deck. And this deck was created by Rachel true who is an actress most well known for the craft and half baked. And she also has this beautiful deck. Which I am so excited that we're using today.

Hilary Adams:

While we are talking about actors and tarot, you do some work with Broadway and tarot.

Emily McGill:

I am working on my own tarot deck. Yes, that is a Broadway tarot deck. So it's been a lot of fun. Because if you're talking about you know, the importance of listening to your own intuition and like really like tapping into your own magic and knowing that your gut in your core, what is your truth and like, the absolute of this is, you know, this is the core belief. This is where I am right now. That is the High Priestess through and through and yet you're also talking about Elphaba in Wicked. So I mean, you can see that there are these similarities in these archetypal characters that we find in all kinds of different stories. So yes, I'm working on on my own. All right. So I think we'll just do a general reading today. For your listeners for anyone who is tapping in. And I think we'll do one of my favorites, which is what will help you what will hinder you and what is your untapped or your unrealized potential?

Hilary Adams:

All right, listeners, this one's for you.

Emily McGill:

So the first thing you're going to do is cut the cards and you're going to tell me when to stop flipping through them. Stop. Great. Okay. So this first card -

Hilary Adams:

could you describe what you were just doing because she was taking the entire card deck and holding it up, in this case the screen because I'm recording this on Zoom, you're going to hear this on audio and two is flipping through it and so as it flipped through, I just thought I want to stop and then she divided the card deck in half and into sections.

Emily McGill:

So that's how we cut the cards when we're doing it digitally. So this first card, this is what will help. And what will help is, the hierophant is the card that we've pulled. And so the hierophant is a major arcana card. It comes, it's number is five, which means it's the sixth card because the fool is zero, the numberless number. And the the hierophant is, has a lot to do with tradition and structures and systems. This is you know, that sort of a high priest or a pope card in some decks. And it's this idea of tradition of how things have always been done. And it's interesting that this comes up for like, what will help because I think that there's so there's been so much new thinking and new ways of doing things. But like what this is sort of talking, I guess what this is saying to me, in relation to the conversation we've been having Hillary is that like this ancient ancient form of communication, this storytelling that we've been talking about the tradition, deep, deep, deep tradition, of telling stories of gathering around a fire of, you know, it being a communal experience of the gathering and the sharing. Like that, that is what will help. What will help is to is following the ancient tradition of story.

Hilary Adams:

You describe what the card looks like for people.

Emily McGill:

Yeah, absolutely. So we see at the center of this, an older man in purple robes seated on a beautiful gold. It looks kind of like a bed, but I think it's supposed to be like a throne of sorts, he's holding a staff, he's got these beautiful rays of light coming out of his head, there are flames coming out of the top of this beautiful gold piece of furniture, there are what looks like St Peter's keys underneath of him. So this could be, you know, St Peter at the gates of heaven, you know, if that's the interpretation of this, that one would want to take. And we also see, you know, these two dark figures at the bottom that are sort of here listening and being receiving the story that or whatever is being said by this figure that is presiding over this, this sort of little gathering we have here. And we can see that both of those figures have their hands folded in a prayer like manner, he's got a staff and one on hand that has like, you know, crosses at the top. And then like, there are St Peter's keys down there. And, you know, we see this like, really elaborate piece of furniture and all of the rays coming out of his head. So there's, there's a lot happening in this and with the background being the sky and clouds, you know, so there's, there's a very sort of like, ethereal radiant quality to this card as well. But its meaning is all about tradition and structure. And that sort of you know, like in the Broadway tarot, I have a cast as Tabea, who of course, is all about tradition, until his daughters teach him about ways of thinking. Yeah, and so that's what's gonna help us. All right, what's gonna hinder us, we have the princess of wands. And so remember, I said that there were four suits, and they correspond to the four elements. So our wands are fire. That's like passion, drive, creativity, the stuff that lights you up that gets you out of bed in the morning. And the princess of wands is you know, the page of wands is the first of our CT cards that we come across, in, in the tarot. And so the page kind of has that full energy that very young, naive, trusting, playful, childlike, you know, it's very, very young. And so I think there's like a warning about playing with fire here is what I'm getting. You know, like, You got to be really careful when you are choosing the stories that you're telling and like if you are going to sit there and put y'all all of your stuff down in one place and decide what stories you're telling, like. You have to think about the how telling those stories is going to affect you and the life that you live in. People around you. Because if you're telling a story that someone else is involved in and you maybe don't have permission from them to tell it, or you know, you are utilizing some real life experience in some way that maybe you haven't cleared with the other people involved, I mean, there's so many ways that things could go sideways, and that you can burn yourself. And so this is saying, I think, like, be really careful and consider it in which stories you're choosing to tell and how you're choosing to tell them. Because you don't want to burn bridges that you don't want to burn. I mean, that was redundant. But

Hilary Adams:

what does this card look like?

Emily McGill:

So this is we see a beautiful, dark skinned woman with some facial markings under her eyes and a lie along her chin, her hair is sort of like waving in the wind, there are some camps and roads behind her, leading to some mountains on either side of her is in that sort of in archway because she's standing in front of like a yellow background where there are flames on either side of her, she's got sandals on her feet, she's holding a staff that looks like it's wrapped in maybe an olive branch or something. And there are red, bright red flowers at each of the corners of the card. That's her top is is like a white tank top, and she's got a long red flowing skirt. And you know, she looks like she's sort of stepping forward into something, she's got on her in her other hand, she's holding one of the flowers that's represented in the corners. And there's sort of like a tattoo on her leg of what looks like some leaves, I think. And she's got some markings also on her arms and chest. I can't tell if it's like tattoo or painted. And then she's wearing some really beautiful wrist bands and a necklace. Or where maybe at the top, it just has this really cool sort of detail, which has a little bit of a flower or tribal motif to it.

Hilary Adams:

It's very different than the first car that goes wild, it looks very,

Emily McGill:

the energy is really different from it, you can see or you know, you can even feel it in talking about the, you know, the sort of fiery version of like, you know, gotta be careful with this fire.

Hilary Adams:

It's very influential, as we talked about- story has power.

Emily McGill:

Yes, it does. And it's untapped power because our third card is the Prince of Wands, which is the next card in that suit. That night card, but Prince is very active, it is very it's like when the fight, you know, when the fire catches. And that's the untapped potential is for the story to catch. And this card, you know, all of the the Knights or the princes are always usually writing some sort of animals. So we might see a different kind of different in different cards. And in this one, we see this dark skinned young man on the back of what looks like a phoenix dragon sort of combination. You know, it's a huge animal with wings that he's flying. Looks like it has a beak, I think it was a bird, but you know,

Hilary Adams:

getting to know Yeah, like a dragon

Emily McGill:

And he's got a staff in his hand that is up near the bird's mouth that is on fire there, there's fire coming off of the off of the ground that we can see, again, we have this blue background with the same flowers in the corners, we can see the mountains behind him where there's a fire blazing on top of the mountains, you know, so this is a very very active card this is like that, that ability like for you know something's flammable is gonna catch and fast. So I think that that what why we have this sort of responsibility of story card that comes before it with that Princess of Wands. And now we're coming into the Prince of Wands saying the untapped potential is for for this to go viral for this to, for people to really to, to embrace it and to see themselves reflected in it. You know, that micro and macro that we were talking about?

Hilary Adams:

Yeah, be aware that. This is what the spark can do. Oh, yeah. Can you describe this a little bit more for people who are it's a very powerful card. It's a hard one to describe that. That bird. Dragon thing almost looks like it's smiling. It doesn't have a negative look on its face to me,

Emily McGill:

right? Yeah, it does look doesn't look like there's any sort of Um, anger or anything there, and it's a bright orange, right like the bird itself was bright orange, there's, you know, feathers everywhere. The young man on here has the same matching wristbands as the princess. We can see he's also got, you know, kind of like a tunic style he's wearing the sun is high in the sky. It's a cloudless sky blue sky behind him. Again, we sort of see this opening, it's through an archway into that background. And he is sort of presented on on his bird or dragon in front of that background.

Hilary Adams:

As well, the beak it's got a very curved beak with kind of like plumes, almost like like rooster plumes on her forehead. Yeah, the sun in the sky. Yep, one stories. When stories catch, they're powerful.

Emily McGill:

Yeah, they are. And there's nothing stopping us. Right? Like, this is such an energetic card that it's like, there's no stopping this,

Hilary Adams:

right? So use caution before.

Emily McGill:

Right? Right. Use, that's why you got to be you know, you got to learn how to play with the fire from our, our princess of wands, right. It's like, you got to learn how to play with it. And that youthful age. And you know, the prince, that energy is oftentimes like adolescent or teen energy. So it's, you know, it's still has has a very reckless abandon about it. And I think that's why you know, the card before it is like, we got to make sure we're learning how to use this in a really safe way, because the reckless abandon is about to come. And people can really get burned, right, like we said that it can be, it can really have negative effects, and how interesting when we hold them all up together. And we can see that despite the fact in this first card, that it's a sky background, and then the furniture is there, for our hierophant these cards actually quite resemble each other all pretty well, we have this gold, you know, this big gold square around the hierophant, we match that with our gold backgrounds that have the arches on them, and both the princess and the Prince of Wands, and, you know, the purple robes seeping into the red skirt going into the orange bird is, you know, we're like, we're in that same family. And we have the bright blue sky back there. And each of them, you know, and there's the, in the hierophant, there's the sense of radiance, and then the other is the actual fire. Right, but like radiants, like, if we look at the sun thing about its gradients, it's a ball of fire, and gas, and like, you know, it's, it's so it's all the same stuff, it's all made of the same stuff. And so we take the helpful knowledge of the ancient history and the structures that exist and the ways of telling stories. And we use that and we tap into all that we can to make that helpful for ourselves, we do have to be careful that we are using that story in a very intentional and specific and deliberate way. That as you said, we are being responsible with the stories that we're telling. And we're you know, we have the the the, the best intentions aren't, don't always, you know, give us the best results, but like, we have to be willing to do the learning and get burned a little bit and take those lessons and accept them as that Princess as the very beginning of this want, you know this fiery journey and know that it's gonna spread like wildfire once we do that work, and once we can tap into it, and we have that Prince of Wands energy that can then just go flying off into the wind with all of this story to share, you know, dropping story along everywhere as you go like that it really just like catches on so quickly. And so we can see the relationship between the three cards, in addition to talking about them as individuals,

Hilary Adams:

everyone was saying we're going to take a photo of this at the end of our recording and so I'll make sure there's a link to the photo in the show notes in case you'd like to see the cards themselves, but they're all very quite orange. And, and there is sort of that idea that when you are showing like there's this idea that you know, there's the radiance from the sun from from the sky from the universe and then the other two of the concretize fire the fire that is from this earth. So it's sort of like that he has been brought into our world into our physical plane if you will. With that Aren't we that we can use

Emily McGill:

responsibly? Right and that it's just totally available to us.

Hilary Adams:

Fascinating. So there you go, everybody listening, a podcast tarot reading for you and a giveaway, I'll make sure there's a link to the images so that you can see them. Thank you for doing that. My pleasure. No fun. Yeah, I think it's it's funny because I also feel like quite a few times on this podcast, I've talked to people about the importance of structure, and the importance how people talked about, you know, tradition and structure, and that information and that knowledge inside of you, before you go forth, and sort of improvise and, and, you know, and create and like, and how creation often works best inside of some structure and grace. That reminds

Emily McGill:

Yeah, you know, I'm so often asked the difference between a tarot deck and an Oracle deck, and its structure is what it is, in an Oracle Deck, the author really has the freedom to have as many cards as they want to have the cards have whatever meanings they want, you know, you just you decide it's your deck, you can make it anything you want. But a tarot deck will always have 78, sometimes 79, depending on the author, they like to add their own cards to Major Arcana. So you'll sometimes see that but you'll 78 or 79th card, and that is that's a tarot deck, and you will always have a major arcana and the Minor Arcana, unless they've only made the Major Arcana, which also happens, right, but like, the idea is that there is always this sort of foundation that it gets built on. And then the perspective or the interpretation is then expressed from there.

Hilary Adams:

Yeah. That's fantastic. Thank you so much. Yeah. If people want to reach you, I realize we haven't talked about that. So how can people connect with

Emily McGill:

you? Yeah, so I hang out on the internet, mostly on my own website at Emily McGill. entertainment.com. And you can learn more about my tarot readings, their communications magic is what I call the other stuff. And I also am on Instagram at Emily Ann mcg. That's Emily Ann and an E mcg. And if you sign up for my newsletter, on my website, I send out a weekly Tarot card poll. So every week you'll get a new tarot card for me about what's going on in the world that week and asking you how it's relating for you. So they'll praise them for

Hilary Adams:

that. That's wonderful. Thank you. And again, those links will be in the show notes make it easy to connect. Before we wrap up today, is there anything else you'd like to share with that?

Emily McGill:

No, just thank you so much for having me. This has been such a delight.

Hilary Adams:

Oh, so much fun. I really appreciate you joining me and Emily, and thank you for doing the Tarot. Also. Anybody wants to have a Tarot reading or anything like that? Is that can they connect with you to your website for that?

Emily McGill:

Yeah, there's a link on my website. And there's actually also a code if you use the code 25% off. The code is cups, so you can use that for 25% Off with 30 or 60 minute reading.

Hilary Adams:

Great. Thanks so much.

Emily McGill:

Thank you.

Outro:

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