Story and Horse

You Can Be Anything with Reyshan Parker

September 03, 2022 Hilary Adams Season 1 Episode 45
Story and Horse
You Can Be Anything with Reyshan Parker
Show Notes Transcript

You Can Be Anything with Reyshan Parker

Meet Reyshan Parker, the Executive Producer and Host of the Food & Travel Docu-Series “Beyond the Check." We talk about the show, his adorable dogs Sugar and Bones, and Reyshan's creative process. Then we are joined by several puppets, including the cat Snips, as we learn inside information about a new project for kids currently in post production! 

Reyshan Parker's Bio:
Beyond the Check is a documentary series about worker-owned restaurants. We find the best and most hidden gems around the country and showcase the story of the establishment, the owners, and of course try some of the best dishes they offer!                 

Reyshan Parker is an American Filmmaker, Producer, Writer, Director and Television Personality. He is the Executive Producer and Host of the Food & Travel Docu-Series “Beyond the Check” about Chef Owned and Operated Restaurants on Fox’s TUBI TV, and Amazon Video, as well as the Beyond the Check Podcast where he dives deeper into all things service industry related and more.

Reyshan is the Director and Producer of the feature film "Odie, Based on the Odyssey by Homer.” As well as a dozen short films, web series, commercials and music videos.

He is the Author of fictional novel "Noir, The Good Girl, The Detective and the Femme Fatale", as well a guide to low budget filmmaking, "The Independents Guide to the Micro-Feature Film".

Reyshan currently resides in Savannah Ga, with his wife Jordan and their two adorable fur babies, Sugar and Bones. 

FIND US EVERYWHERE @ http://popleme.co/beyondthecheck

APPLE PODCAST: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/beyond-the-check-podcast
SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/03hqKxXeJndwZudOpsloYG
FULL EPISODES of BEYOND THE CHECK TV SERIES on AMAZON VIDEO: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08M4532YS
TUBI-TV https://tubitv.com/series/300006106/beyond-the-check-worker-owner-edition

WEBSITE https://independentlasagna.com/beyond-the-check
INSTAGRAM  https://www.instagram.com/beyondthecheck_
LINKEDIN https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/beyondthecheck

FIND REYSHAN AT:
WEBSITE http://reyshanparker.com
FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/reyshanjparker/
LINKEDIN https://www.linkedin.com/in/reyshanparker/
INSTAGRAM  https://www.instagram.com/reyshanparker
TIKTOK https://www.tiktok.com/@reyshanparker
SUGAR & BONES ON IG https://www.instagram.com/sugarnbonez

Host Hilary Adams is an award-winning theatre director, coach, equine-partnered facilitator, and founder of Story and Horse.

Connect with Story and Horse
www.storyandhorse.com
Facebook: @storyandhorse
Instagram: @storyandhorse

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Intro:

Welcome to Story and Horse, a podcast where we hear stories from creative lives. Meet new people, hear about their challenges and triumphs, and get inspired to move forward with your creativity. Now, here's your host, Hilary Adams.

Hilary Adams:

Hello, thanks for joining me here on the Story and Horse Podcast. I'm your host, Hilary Adams. I'm a theatre director, coach and founder of Story and Horse and I work with people to help get their creativity out into the world. Here on the podcast. We need people to be in creative lives, hear their stories and gather inspiration for our own creativeness. Today we're joined by Reyshan Parker, Reyshan is an American filmmaker, producer, writer, director and television personality. He is the executive producer and host of the food and travel Docu series Beyond the Check about chef owned and operated restaurants on Fox Tubi TV and Amazon Video, as well as the Beyond the Check podcast where he dives deeper into all things service industry related and more bearish on thanks for joining me.

Reyshan Parker:

Hi, Hilary. Thanks for having me.

Hilary Adams:

And we have somebody sitting with you and I know people can't see it because we're audio but who's joining us who's that handsome guy?

Reyshan Parker:

This is a Chinese Crested powder puff and his name is Bones.

Hilary Adams:

I'm here he's so cute because adorable dog he's got

Reyshan Parker:

it looks like a really he looks like a miniature like sheep dog kinda when his hair grows out.

Hilary Adams:

with these gorgeous ears. So are they in the super smart breed?

Reyshan Parker:

He's pretty smart. I want to give them a talk pads. I figured he's one of the only dogs in the house that can like they could use it. Because he knows where his treats are. He knows how to he's, he's he talks. He's like our walk.

Hilary Adams:

Oh, look at him. Look at you. Alright, so now we clearly got distracted by Bones. We got this adorable dog with that. So tell us who you are. And I know you're you're doing a lot of different things. So what are you up to?

Unknown:

So hi, I'm Reyshan Parker. I'm the host and executive producer of the travel food show Beyond the Check we find chef owned restaurants, hang out with them find out about their lives, the history of the restaurant. And of course, let them cook up and have me try some of the best dishes they have to offer. So I do that. So go watch my show beyond the check. It's streaming on Amazon Prime and Tubi, TV. Tubi TV. It's Fox is free TV. So there's commercials but it's free tons of stuff on there.

Hilary Adams:

And you've written some books.

Reyshan Parker:

I got a book called Noir the Good Girl the Detective and the Femme Fatale I wrote years ago that was based off a screenplay that I had written that was a much longer story knew our back right after I graduated grad school, one of my professors happened to be one of the producers of fried green tomatoes and The Breakfast Club. And he actually offered me $300,000 To make my movie. But my producer and my friend at the time, he wasn't real keen on. And so he said that he would make the movie, but I couldn't make it. I had to lose him. And so I had to choose between a Hollywood producer, and my friend, producer who we were he had Burt Reynolds for us already. And he, you know, we wanted to make like $4.3 million, as opposed to 300,000. And so like an idiot, I went with my friend instead of their producer pragmatism. And so long story short, we didn't get that movie made and Burt Reynolds died. And so still to this day, I haven't made the movie, but the book is out there. And you can you can buy the book. I think only on Lulu Press right now. But

Hilary Adams:

there's, there's a second book that you have that has to do with

Reyshan Parker:

filmmaking, right. I made a silly guide on how to make a feature film for $10,000. How to make it my independent was on his guide to the micro budget feature film, which is really it's outdated now like so every everything in there as far as equipment and stuff. Some of it's not like writing and the producing parts, but the distributions surely outdated. And the some of the equipment I'm sure is outdated, but it was like an interactive ebook where you could go in and it was basically an outline on step by step how to make a movie, but then it had links to articles across the internet like so YouTube videos just in more depth or articles or links or websites as you go to for extended information. So it's kind of like kind of like an interactive book just to guide you through the internet to teach you how to make a movie. Right, all the links and the resources that are available at the time. And they're still I'm sure all available, but that it could surely be updated. Because before even the ability to make movies by phones, right, so I never even touched on the ease that that made for, you know, independent filmmakers.

Hilary Adams:

Yeah. And although you're the book, you're the book, movie the norm, I didn't get me you did create a feature film, is that correct?

Reyshan Parker:

The so there's the short the 10 Minute prologue is out there and noir point O. On my YouTube channel. Beyond the check on YouTube, you find all my little movies, a bunch of bunch of short films, probably like 12 minute like 12 short films, one feature film called Od Bass and the Odyssey by Homer, which is the movie that I saw after I wrote the guide on how to make a feature film, I haven't actually made one yet. So I followed my guide, and made a feature film for $10,000. With all my like grad school friends, I flew him in and fed them, they worked for free, and we all made a movie together.

Hilary Adams:

So how to Beyond the Check come about

Unknown:

You know, I've kind of floundered around after the Noir fell apart, and couldn't really figure out what I wanted to do. And so for some reason, I was I was taking servers out and I was doing a thing called Beyond the Check where I'd take servers to go do something. And we just talked about restaurant life, because I obviously I've worked in restaurants since I was like 15 years old. So why not make that a show service and watch servers talk about work? Because that's what they do. And I was like, this is fine, but it's not. I don't think I'm like helping anybody or doing anything. And so I wanted to do something positive to like, help out. Something I just couldn't figure out what was the positive thing that I could be doing with my skills. And so we made a show called Media Matters. Small Business Challenge, which is this is before like, Main Street came out, which is like small business challenge with a redo a whole town. And so like we're making, or editing and finishing up, Media Matters. And all of a sudden, the show comes on the air and I'm like, Oh my God, that's my show. But we've found a small like pos - , we find small, positive small businesses who just didn't seem to have it together, like online or with their marketing, and, you know, but they're awesome businesses, right, like positive businesses. So like a vegan restaurant was like our little pilot. And then a friend of ours in town started a company called Beat Tan, which is all natural spray tanning. So like, no chemicals made of beets, and like, Honey is a preservative. And like, it's, it's actually took off now. But we took her because she didn't really her website was junk. She didn't really have any marketing, she didn't really know how to make that work. So a friend of mine, the webmaster, offered 30 hours of his free time, like, you know, help these people out on the show with me. And so we did that full episode. It's like an hour long, where we redid her website. And so now she could have like, franchises or websites franchisable. You know, it's gorgeous website. And she's doing great. Now she has franchises around the country. And Beet Tan is, you know, that's her only job. Now, as far as I know, you can pay for that on Amazon. It's like $1. But anyway, it was just too complicated. It's too much work, we're gonna do this wood restoration company. It just never came together. And it was just so much work for everybody involved. It took so long just to make one episode. That was like something else. And so coming off of that little YouTube Beyond the Check thing, I was like, Man, I should do restaurants. Like I need to do real restaurants. And my father had passed away. And we had gone up to Ohio, for his Celebration of Life party. And my sister and her husband have been inherited restaurant that's been in his family for like 30 years, and they run that last 12-15 years. And so it's like, hey, like, I just like it was just me and my wife. Like, and I got my other sister to like, be the assistant camera person. Like, can you hold a camera and we're just gonna do this, we're gonna shoot like little thing for Asia. And we're gonna like, make or like some commercials or something I really didn't have a format was just go in the restaurant, interview them, have them cook me some food, whatever. And I just made them some ads or something like that. And put a little show together. And so I made that one. I went home and edited that and it was done. I showed him some people and they're like, this might be the best thing you've ever made. Thanks. And so I got my one of my producer buddies to help me go fund small restaurants and he's good friends with a chef in town. So Episode Two was Noble Fair in Savannah, Chef Pat. And from there. I was like, hey, where else should we go? And so for season one was all recommendations from one chef or one of the employees to the next restaurant. Okay, and so one of the servers there was like, oh, have you been out to been to Amir's or Poor Richard's been out to Poor Richard's. It's in Bluffton ins like they do many changes every day. I'm like, that sounds great. So I called them like, hey, when the service used to work for you said, I

Reyshan Parker:

need to be on my show. And I'm like, Yeah, great. Come on. So we did that. And they're like, Oh, you gotta go to Mir era. You know, he was on him and Amanda, who owns palm, Midori, Italian restaurant and Season One had both been on Bike Club, which is like Food Network's like they take chefs from a small town and make some of the contestants and some of them the judges. And so Mir was a judge and Amanda was a contestant and Amanda actually won. So I was shooting near lilies in Wilmington Island. And he's like, Oh, you need a you need a Do you have any female chefs yet? I'm like, No, I don't I need, like, you gotta go see Amanda. She actually won by club, like, so I called man. And I'm like, Hey, so I said, I need to kind of just like yeah, come on. And that's basically just how season one went. And we wrapped season one on March 8. Is that right? Yeah. March 8 2020. And the next week the country shut down. It's helping Uh huh. So we got Season One edited and out and then shot Season Two in December of 2020. At the end of that just around Georgia and South Carolina again, because nowhere else was really open and didn't want to travel that far. And that was more just like finding the farm to table restaurants and like contacting them and being like, Hey, I make the show. Check off the show. Do that you know if you want to be on it. And for the most part 90% of anyone I've ever contacts has been like, Yeah, sure. So got that one shot and then we went to Texas in December of this year, or last year, I guess it would have been and shot Season Three which will be out in January, fingers crossed. Fall goes well season three will be out in January. We go to Texas we barbecue we European food, we go to a real Chinese restaurant, we go to a true farm to table and Bryan Texas where it's literally Ronan farm and Ronan restaurant. So run and farm serves run and restaurant all 90% of everything that they serve. And except for the fish just drive to Houston every Monday to pick that up. But otherwise, most everything is literally from their farm to their table. That's fun. And a couple other farm to table places. Texas has a lot to offer. You got to drive a long ways to get everything.

Hilary Adams:

What's your favorite thing that has been cooked for you?

Reyshan Parker:

I don't know.

Hilary Adams:

What's one of your favorite that's been cooked for you.

Reyshan Parker:

I mean, I've had some really good speeches that that I don't normally order. Ceviche, it's not a thing. If I go to a restaurant, I'm gonna order. But I've had several different ones made for me. And they've, they've been spectacular. But if you go to like a chef's tasting menu, those, those are the best because you get so much variety that if you don't like one thing you're gonna like next thing you know. And so just to be able to try all the different stuff. And my wife is super picky. So part of my inspiration was to drag her around and make her eat stuff that she would normally because like it's in her contract, just like a one bite of everything grudgingly, she went along with this for season one, and she's a little happier in season two. And season three, she's actually in the kitchen cooking with the chef's too. And so is my camera girl. So it's not just me hanging out chefs in season three, it'll be the wife hanging out with the chefs and Nikki there camera girl, or director of photography gets in the kitchen and hangs out with the chef's too. So it's a whole lot more variety. And yeah.

Hilary Adams:

So how did you get started as a as a storyteller, because everything you've talked about so far is about storytelling.

Reyshan Parker:

Okay, so I was homeschooled until eighth grade. And a book that my mother gave us. As a child, when I could start to write was this like create your own storybook. And so it had like a header at the top and then you just go from there. So you just write, please just write whatever. Don't worry about your spelling, just tell the story. And so my spelling is still to this day, what kind of treasures but so I just tell the stories. And then when I was like 11 is an 80s Sort of in who know I guess, like 1990 89 We had it earlier than that though. Maybe it was 10. Anyway, we've got a video camera and video cameras back in the day had all the editing on the side of a TV connected it to a VCR. You could loop back in but overdub music onto stuff you could cut, you know, hit record play, and you record that scene stops up in the literal you're just editing from VCRs to the camcorder. And so I did that with my sisters like Nasik videos and I made Lego movies before like Lego movies birthday I'm pretty sure and rip off of Batman called Quick Man that I made three of that I made my dad do the DP four. And my dad bought computers, he worked for IBM clone company. So they built knockoff PCs. And I used to look at the VCR and at the computer and be like, somehow, these two things have to go together. But this is like in like, 1985 no little man. Yeah. Because before the video gets, right, it's the VCR, VCR and the computer and I'm like that somehow. I'm like, eight years old. And like, somehow those are gonna go together someday. And then now that that's all it is, right? Like, the future did come. But as a child, I was like, somehow, how can I put me inside that computer? How can I get my image to like and put in like crazy background effects and like, make effects like, like an eight year old? Um, yeah, I mean, we got the video camera and you still couldn't connect them to the computer. And it wasn't until God I was in my undergrad where like Vegas Pro came out where you can, you know, upload your footage in and then and then what? Final Cut Pro, and then it was all that's what it was. It was taking that videotape and putting it into the computer and you could finally do it. And so I did my undergrad and playwriting at Ohio University. Originally, all through high school, I was an actor, and we wrote our own skits and stuff. I was like in the elite actors ensemble. So like we put on, like two shows a year where we basically be Saturday Night Live. And we wrote all the skits. And so I was I was gone to Ohio University's I wanted to be an actor, and I literally screw the audition up so bad, and they only want you to audition twice. And if you messed up the first time, they recommend that you don't bother reapplying that you should just look into something else. Like I was a good actor. I just really, I don't know, I don't know, I've made I was hung over. Who knows. But anyway, I loved that so bad that I ended up in playwriting, which later I was thankful for. Because the actors had to do so much work and as playwrights just for like, you know, we just worked on our own time. But the actors they were, you know, they had work all the time, like they didn't really have free time. So, you know, blessing in disguise, I did not end up in the Acting Program. Instead, I wrote, like seven different, like full length plays, because I just take the same playwriting class over again as my electives, like, right, another play. And I want some, like some awards or someplace I wanted to go to grad school because under a you didn't offer Film School for undergrads, you could have a minor so I had a film minor. And I got divorced, right or was getting divorced right around the same time I got accepted SCAD. And so I came to Savannah, Georgia, to do my master's in film and television. And I've been in Spanner ever since. So here we are. And now we're making the kids TV show kids food show called snips tips, we just got finished shooting 90% of it, it's going into post now, it's a little cat a Cat puppet. It's a puppet show. So what people do with a whole bunch of different segments, so Snips is the cat who hangs out with a chef. And they have a dish say nachos that they're going to make. And so each preparation of the nachos, they make their own chips and stuff, we got into another little segment of like, how to food for not how to food but behind the food where it explains and it's really fun kind of Hollywood Minute kind of way. The chips and the cheese and you know, they talk about whatever. And then there's a food wizard who explains the science of like a thing like either how the oil effects chipped, make a crispy, and then we have a timetable, which is basically a ripoff Rick and Morty, where they go back in time to find out the origin of the dish, which is fun. And then what else we got in there. And it's like a food fantastical a whole bunch of like fun little food segments all surrounding one dish. A game show called Hell healthy is it hosted by Brock steamer where squirrel and a dog argue over getting it right on how healthy dishes turns out. Most students and kids alike are not healthy for you. So we're trying to educate them on like we have a french fry up so you know it's all fun and games. So you find out that the french fry, really not good for you and you sometimes

Hilary Adams:

some idea come to me it sounds very different than what you've been doing.

Reyshan Parker:

I don't have kids either. So it's it comes out of the desire to like, do something positive to the world, right and kids. I just read an article the other day that kids think French fries are meat. Like if you ask a kid what something is they just don't know anymore and I don't like literally was like 80% of kids asked him like what something was they had no idea. So just food education just like trying to make you healthier from the get right or least like tricking you into it with like fun stuff you're like yeah. How healthy is it? Oh my god, Mom, it's not healthy at all. We don't have that.

Hilary Adams:

And you don't happen to be doing the puppet. Right?

Reyshan Parker:

I have you play Snips actually.

Hilary Adams:

Really?

Reyshan Parker:

Hi. Hello. Hi, what's up this? This is fantastic chef Rene Naggy and today we're making nachos. You like nachos? Good. I like nachos. But imagine a cat puppet. But that's the voice. Yeah.

Hilary Adams:

Are you doing that puppet also?

Reyshan Parker:

I guess. Yeah, I get the hand cramps. Wow.

Hilary Adams:

What type of puppet is it?

Reyshan Parker:

It's just a cute little cat puppet? Was like, just like a cute little string. We put a little chef's hat on and he's got all those chef's coat. Can we find out? Can we find out where nachos were embedded? We sure can Snips. Cool. Let's go to the time table. Well you're welcome.

Hilary Adams:

I don't even know where to go. Now. I just got snips. So that's the thing. We're gonna we're gonna have it done here is at some point. Let's, let's uh, squirrel. Well, that's the wizard. So that's okay. So for people who are listening, I'm staring. I'm looking at puppets right now.

Reyshan Parker:

This is a squirrel that always wins to how healthy as a game show. So this is an Yeah, my [can't hear this] has brought me these puppets. Have you heard me talking?

Hilary Adams:

Good. Can you describe them? To our listeners?

Reyshan Parker:

This is a wizard who wears a blue cape and he basically is a Mac magician who pops in out of all different sides of the screen to tell you facts about how stuff is done with like intercut with the you know, cool graphics of like, chips being fried or something. This is a sandwich. This is Sammy the sandwich. He's just a big sandwich puppet. He does the recap on Food News. So as we recap with everything we learned in the episode, it's basically like The Daily Show, but with just with the sandwich puppet, who will tell you the news and the foods.

Hilary Adams:

So for people who are listening, thatsandwich puppet has these two gigantic googly eyes at the top and it's very cute. I'm not sure we definitely have lettuce and looks like

Reyshan Parker:

there's a couple of pickles at the top there. Yeah, yeah, he has to go on a blue screen that gets pickles pickled

Hilary Adams:

because the pixels are green and so that even show

Reyshan Parker:

Yep. That's right.

Hilary Adams:

Are you doing all the voices

Reyshan Parker:

no, no, but somebody else did does his voice but that was that was what I would pretend to be the sandwiches.

Hilary Adams:

And we have a squirrel and the squirrel looked a little lion-y. He's got like, you got like tops in his on his ears and a big bushy tail and a cute belly.

Reyshan Parker:

So his segment I wasn't around when when these segments were shot, so I honestly don't know what squirrel sounds like I haven't watched the dailies but I'm sure it sounds something like a Squirrel Hi, are you nuts? I'm nuts

Hilary Adams:

this podcast that somebody has brought in puppets

Reyshan Parker:

Yeah, it and it's just me and two other like you guys, grown men playing with puppets.

Hilary Adams:

I think it sounds like a fantastic idea. As an adult. I feel like I learned a lot about nutrition and cooking. And you know

Reyshan Parker:

It's like the Sesame Street for food. I think it's what we're going for.

Hilary Adams:

That's your that's your pitch?

Reyshan Parker:

Yeah, I know, yeah.

Hilary Adams:

I love that. Maybe the people who are watching Beyond the Check who have kids? Can you know this can dovetail with them for them?

Reyshan Parker:

That's right. Yeah, I have three nephews and a niece. So I and I have three younger sisters. So it's not like I don't have experience around kids or dealing with them. I grew up with three of them. But my Furbabies

Hilary Adams:

Yeah. For a show like this Do you have? How does it work? Do you do like a test audience with the kids?

Reyshan Parker:

No, we just make it. So we make the show and then so then it'll get cut into like a teaser trailer or, and then a pitch packet. So you make a show, right? Or at least make the demo for a show. Traditionally, you know you can even make a trailer for a movie that doesn't exist right and that would be your pet Each packet to investors try to get them to make a full movie, you go and shoot like a little sample. And so we just made a whole season as a sample. So six episodes, we did nachos, french fries, cupcakes, part phase, chicken nugget, dinosaur chicken nuggets, and cupcakes. Cupcakes are not good for you. So we did all redoing all six of those. And then we'll make a, you know, a trailer out of all of that and a pitch packet and start sending it to companies and fingers crossed, somebody likes it, and they want to pick it up. And if not, then we'll you know, we'll release it independently, but versus trying to sell it.

Hilary Adams:

So you've already lost a couple of stories, is there a story that you'd like to share? Something about creativity.

Reyshan Parker:

Here's the thing about doing things is that do it people think that you can't do something? And they're like, how did you do that? Right? Like, how do you get a TV show? How do you know, because you, you can't sit around and wait for it to happen, right? Like, if I sat around waiting for just kept sending out like, videos of me being like, hi, you should, you should make a show out of me. I can do this not the other without any, like proof that you can do it. All you have to you can do anything. All you fake it till you make it right, like anyone out there who wants to be something, you can just go start beating it, you can literally just do that, if that's what you and then you're known for it. But it's it starts with doing it first. And once you start doing it, it is the thing that you do, right. So if you want to, if you want to be a TV host, right, start make, start hosting TV shows come up, you know, it, take in your spare time, the ability to start making things on YouTube, or, you know, Instagram Tiktok. You know, if I had the ability when I was a kid, to have the phone with the power to just make whatever you want, and be able to buy cheap microphones that sound good to be, you know, just the ability to do and create that we all have at our fingertips now, I think is really brought out a creative outlet, and a large portion of the population that didn't know that they needed it or that it was you know, because I feel like a lot of, you know, influencers are just people who were just had all this pent up creativity, and someone gave them a phone and a tick tock app. And they're just like, Yeah, I'm an actor now. Like, I play all the characters, right? And so you have all these people out there just doing that now who might not have ever had the opportunity. But if that's your thing, you can just make yourself that thing because social media will believe that you are as long as you that is what you're doing. Right.

Hilary Adams:

You can be a puppeteer,

Reyshan Parker:

you can be a puppeteer, just make a puppet show. I mean, granted, I mean I we have the equipment, the skills they have, you know, 10,000 plus dollars worth of equipment just to be able to do that. So it's not like your phone can green screen, you tick tock, right, you put a puppy and you'll start making a little stuff like,

Hilary Adams:

All right, so what are you going to jump into next after the cooking show?

Reyshan Parker:

Yes. We might make more.

Hilary Adams:

I hear a little bit of like, yeah, maybe a little bit of residence there. Maybe.

Reyshan Parker:

It's just, it's just doing it all over again, trying to get all that money again, then I don't know what I want to make it my way, which is like, really easy. And without dealing with red tape or full on trying to raise you know, a million plus dollars and do it the right way.

Hilary Adams:

So So is there out there like in the future? Is there like a dream project or something you'd like to jump into that you haven't touched before? That's sort of like a like you were saying, like, I don't really know how to do this. But I really want to I mean,

Reyshan Parker:

I got a couple books. I'd like to write my older age. I'll find a fun book that I already started years ago called mundane. And it's about a it's about a construction worker who's just lives is very boring, mundane, everyday American life. And but all the objects in his world comment on his life. Right? So like so it's just basically commentary from every from his belt who you know, who's got who's been pulled up a notch or two over the last few years, but it's still it's still hoping that maybe he'll run one day. So it's real fun to read. It's very Hitchhiker's Guide. And I kind of had the inspiration of like, what what was life like when when the two characters in hitchhikers met. He's just standing in a meet he saves the guy from falling into a pothole who has happens to be an alien, right? Who then eventually like, shows him that he can be whatever he wants to be in. It doesn't have to just be the guy holding the stop sign on the side of the street and the sun smoking cigarettes. But all strikers, there's like inanimate objects kind of thinking or being sentient. Just a fun way to approach the world. I thnk.

Hilary Adams:

Before we wrap up, I want to two things. One is, is there anything you'd like to share about your your dogs

Unknown:

you can follow the dogs at Sugar n Bonez, sugar, word sugar, the letter n, and then bones with a Z, Bo and e z on Instagram, there adorbs sugar tones on Instagram. They're adorable.

Hilary Adams:

Do they help inspire your creativity or anything like that with you? They're in season three of Beyond the Check. So they're in all the car interviews. So because we drove a Tesla to Texas, so we we bought our Tesla, like, I don't know, a month before we were leaving for Texas. And I was like, Is this a good idea? Short range. So short range Tesla, all from Savannah to Austin. It took us 26 hours, straight charging for 10 hours, 16 hours of driving. But anyway, the dogs are with us the whole time. So the dogs hung out in dog mode, why we'd film Jordan would go out and walk the dogs around parking lots of whatever. And but they're just the in the cars. And I do interviews with like, supporting people from the restaurants in the car and like drive them around. So the dogs are always in the car when I do the interviews, so basically, every interview of season three in the cars is like my guest with like a dog on their lap just dealing with the cuteness while trying to be interviewed. So that's fun.

Reyshan Parker:

They're gonna make an appearance at the end of Episode Six in season two, where the dogs are magically I look, they've been here the whole time. But in season three, they're literally there the whole time.

Hilary Adams:

So I'd like you to share if you would, how people can reach you. And there'll be a lot of links in the show notes.

Reyshan Parker:

If you Google my name REYSH A N. That's all you got to do just Google my first lesson. It's actually my middle name, whatever. Google my name. And you will find everything. You can also go to Popple. Popple Me P O P L M E dot C O front slash beyond the check. And that's it in here. Just Google beyond the check. That's Google, Google. Super Google.

Hilary Adams:

Any last thoughts you'd like to share?

Reyshan Parker:

Hey, kids, you gotta eat all my vegetables. Okay. Make sure make sure that Yeah, but you have a good portion of vegetables with every meal. It's super important for for growing from going boys and girls.

Hilary Adams:

And for all of us adults to make sure you eat your vegetables.

Reyshan Parker:

Just because you can buy a pint of ice cream doesn't mean add one every day.

Hilary Adams:

It's a sometimes food.

Reyshan Parker:

I think that's that's what Cookie Monster says now anyway. Cookie Monster not affiliated with Snips [can't hear] in any way, shape, or form.

Hilary Adams:

Thank you so much for joining me here today.

Reyshan Parker:

Thanks for having me Hilary

Hilary Adams:

it's so much fun.

Reyshan Parker:

Anytime

Hilary Adams:

Bye.

Reyshan Parker:

Take care.

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